One who offers life abundantlyqe8v1t0tsfhwqe2pz2blk6iwmlimgp0dOne who offers life abundantly">One who offers life abundantlyu2bul8vc618p9rzd2f9lfykuz3c2lnvoOne who offers life abundantly

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There’s an 1ub3rjeet7n24s6pkgw13thy6i3hykctarticle in the New Yorker (via Tim Challies) about euthanasia in Belgium. The main story of the article is a man looking for answers to what happened to his mother, who suffered from depression all her life and in the end committed doctor-assisted suicide. The story is both heartbreaking and troubling. Troubling, for all the baggage that comes with euthanasia and because it portrays 1ub3rjeet7n24s6pkgw13thy6i3hykcta society careening down a road to self-destruction. 61ar5elglxxwderg5jatt7bt2c1ffc9kHeartbreaking because of the woman and her son. She found no help in modern psychiatry, only useless platitudes. Her son has found no answers. Sadly, neither does he appear to have philosophical foundations to mount an argument against the secular idea of a human being as Autonomous Self-fulfillment Machine.gm1u8s0xy2jkg9s55v8ca6sr3gjnzy07

But what got me really thinking was Luke 7:36-50, my Bible reading for the day, which I picked up immediately after reading the New Yorker article. What a powerful contrast it is. A woman with no hope comes to Jesus, braving the scorn of all the best of her society. He receives her with grace, gives her dignity with his response to the leaders, and deals with the reality of her sin (which Luke declines to identify) not by brushing it off, but with forgiveness. Jesus is who the Belgian lady needed. 8j16oh300d3srf8vbqtyt9qt7ip80ot1And all her enlightened secular society could offer was…death. So sad.4d55moz7u1ru4kwmsbqqb8ids03x9ntz

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I have come that they may have life and have it to the full” (John 10:10)ch33orr5zmpl9uzexnos8nz1wvn3nbh2

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(original) View Español translation

There’s an article in the New Yorker (via Tim Challies) about euthanasia in Belgium. The main story of the article is a man looking for answers to what happened to his mother, who suffered from depression all her life and in the end committed doctor-assisted suicide. The story is both heartbreaking and troubling. Troubling, for all the baggage that comes with euthanasia and because it portrays a society careening down a road to self-destruction. Heartbreaking because of the woman and her son. She found no help in modern psychiatry, only useless platitudes. Her son has found no answers. Sadly, neither does he appear to have philosophical foundations to mount an argument against the secular idea of a human being as Autonomous Self-fulfillment Machine.

But what got me really thinking was Luke 7:36-50, my Bible reading for the day, which I picked up immediately after reading the New Yorker article. What a powerful contrast it is. A woman with no hope comes to Jesus, braving the scorn of all the best of her society. He receives her with grace, gives her dignity with his response to the leaders, and deals with the reality of her sin (which Luke declines to identify) not by brushing it off, but with forgiveness. Jesus is who the Belgian lady needed. And all her enlightened secular society could offer was…death. So sad.

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I have come that they may have life and have it to the full” (John 10:10)

 


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